Posts Tagged ‘ Photographer ’

A wedding photographer takes the plunge !

Here’s an utterly classic photography clip from you tube. I know that a wedding photographers job is difficult but this is simply hilarious. Enjoy and have a little bit of sympathy.

Hasselblad H4D 40 and H4D 50 Launch at The Pro Centre, London.

On Wednesday the 10th of February, Hasselblad launched their new range of cameras at 50 locations worldwide. I attended the launch at The Procentre, one of London’s largest rental companies and was immediately impressed with the new range of cameras. The launch was very well attended and everything was laid on to have an enjoyable and informative session. The build quality of the cameras was everything you would expect from Hasselblad. There were no noticeable differences between the H4D 40 and the H4D 50 and they both handled equally as well. The main new feature of the cameras was the True Focus button which is situated near the shutter button. Hasselblad’s revolutionary “True Focus” has made the camera much easier to handle and the focusing was as fast as a top of the range DSLR but obviously the picture quality is twice as impressive due to the sensor being twice the size. I love working with the large files that medium format digital provides. The ability to crop into an image, without rendering your file too small for stock library submission, is a major plus point. I’ve done most of my stock work on a Nikon D2X but I’m unable to crop satisfactory, due to stock submission guidelines and image quality. Serious stock shooters will be looking towards medium format digital in increasing numbers I believe.

Below are some of the example’s of images I took at the launch. A couple of the images have been cropped heavily and all have been slightly tweaked in the Phocus software that Hasselblad provided. Phocus has also improved and is becoming one of my favorite pieces of software. You very rarely need to use Photoshop now, which is testament to how good Phocus has become.

This still life was with the H4D 50

This was with the H4D 40.

The following set of images were of the model, Zoe Cornwall, who was excellent to work with. It must be very daunting for a model to perform at an event where there are so many photographers but Zoe was at ease immediately and proved to be a fantastic model for the day.

All the model shots were on the Hasselblad H4D 40. The H4D 50 was in great demand elsewhere !

Hasselblad will be staging further “hands on days” in the future and I’d advise all photographers to have a play with these great cameras.

Tim Simmons Photography

One of the best photographers based in London at the moment is Tim Simmons. I’ve been watching his work for a while and I’m staggered at how beautiful his images are.

There is a real dreamlike quality to the imagery yet they are magnificently composed, lit and super sharp.

His work reminds me of Gregory Crewdson but without the people. Sometimes you don’t need a strong narrative to create innovative work. Enjoy.

gallery picture

This one is called “Tucson Palm Wall 2004” from the Arizona Series.

gallery picture

“Leaplish Wood Path 2004” from the Northumberland Series.

gallery picture

“Norfolk Crop Square 2005” from the Norfolk Series.

You can find more of Tim’s work at http://www.timsimmons.co.uk

Three of my favourite photography books 2

Edward Burtyensky’s book on Quarries is magnificent. The scale of his images, the composition and the narrative behind the pictures is breathtaking. Genius.

Quarries

Three of my favourite photography books

I love the work of Stephen Gill, a London based photographer. His work is always challenging and thought provoking.
To bury your work is bonkers yet brilliant. Stephen is a true original.

Buried

Buried

The photographs in this book were taken in Hackney Wick and later buried there. The amount of time the images were left underground varied depending on the amount of rainfall. The depths that the pictures were buried at also varied, as did their positioning. Sometimes they were facing each other, sometimes back to back or sometimes buried singly. When burying my first batch of photographs, a passing man spotted me and asked what I was doing. Not only did I not want to give the location away of some of my buried pictures, but It just sounded a bit weird to say that I was burying photographs so replied that I was looking for newts. As soon as Iā€™d said that I looked down and saw a newt at my feet. Not knowing what an image would look like once it was dug up introduced an element of chance and surprise which I found appealing. This feeling of letting go and in a way collaborating with place ā€“ allowing it also to work on putting the finishing touches to a picture ā€“ felt fair. Maybe the spirit of the place can also make its mark.
Stephen Gill